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DATELINE: March 30, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS for the Spring 2018 Issue of EXHIBITION

Exhibition is a journal of exhibition theory & practice for museum professionals, published by NAME, the National Association for Museum Exhibition.

"Object Experiences"

Proposals due June 1, 2017

The spring 2018 issue of Exhibition, “Object Experiences,” seeks proposals that explore innovative ways to engage visitors with (all kinds of) objects in museums. Proposals should address one or more of the following:
Design—for example: object-centered design; visitor-object interaction and cognitive science; Universal Design and object display; use of audio, media, lighting, immersion, interactivity, and technology; designing object-related opportunities for visitor participation
Interpretation—for example: how to use objects to tell visual stories; how to create narratives around objects that foster close encounters; how to create new stories around existing collections; how to address objects that have difficult or offensive histories
Questions—for example: What is the role of objects in exhibitions in the digital age? What is the role of authenticity—and of models, props, and reproductions?

The exhibitions/installations analyzed can be of any size, and take place in any of a variety of spaces: museums of all disciplines, historical sites, galleries, institutions that collect and display living collections, outdoor public spaces, or other physical environments. Proposals might come from designers, architects, curators, exhibit developers, interpretive planners, writers, educators, collection managers, or others who create and contribute to exhibitions.

Proposals must:
tell how the proposed article will relate to the issue’s theme;
indicate the approaches, strategies, or knowledge that readers will take away from the article;
convey how the article will raise questions or illuminate larger issues about exhibitions that are widely applicable (especially if the proposal focuses on a single project or institution); and
take into account that articles will be expected to provide critical, candid discussions about issues and challenges; if citing a project’s success, they will be expected to provide some level of evaluation in support of the claim.

In evaluating article proposals, we will consider the following: how well does the proposed article relate to the issue’s theme? Is the goal of the proposed article clear? Are its ideas expressed well? Is the description focused? Is the topic relevant and timely? Does it promise to do more than describe—for example, will it convey challenges, solutions, and takeaways? Does the approach offer a new way of looking at, thinking about, designing for, or developing exhibitions? Would it have broad appeal and applicability to a variety of museums in a variety of places and of varying sizes? Has the writer or writers clearly conveyed their qualifications for writing the proposed article?

Deadlines and information
Proposals of 250 words maximum (as Word documents only) are due June 1, 2017. In addition to the proposal, please provide a brief description of your background and qualifications for writing the article. Our editorial advisory board will vet proposals in a blind review, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance in late June. If your proposal is accepted, articles (2,000 words maximum with four to five high-resolution images, captions, and credits) will be due in late August 2017.

Please send all proposals via email to:
Ellen Snyder-Grenier (esnydergrenier@yahoo.com), Editor, Exhibition.
Submissions from colleagues and students around the world are welcomed and encouraged.

Download the Call for Papers PDF.

View the online archive of the journal.

Subscribe to the Journal on the website of the American Alliance of Museums.

 

DATELINE: November 1, 2016

Call for Papers for the Fall 2017 Issue of Exhibition (formerly Exhibitionist)

NOTE: This call for papers is now closed. Please look back in early April for spring 2018's call for papers.

Exhibition is a journal of exhibition theory & practice for museum professionals, published by NAME, the National Association for Museum Exhibition.

"Exhibiting the Issues of Our Times"

Proposals due January 4, 2017

In his August 1963 “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” Martin Luther King Jr. writes that we “are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly.” The journal’s fall 2017 issue looks at the exhibition as forum/activist/advocate for the issues of our times—issues that, as King writes, affect all of us, directly or indirectly. In our age of conflict and uncertainty, marked both by an acute sense of crisis and by a surging commitment to change, how can exhibitions speak to these issues and contribute to contemporary dialogues about them?

Proposals should describe exhibitions that address pressing national/global issues: climate change; racial equity; immigration; inequality (such as economic, educational, gender, or around issues of sexual orientation); mass incarceration; mass violence; nuclear proliferation; or others. They should convey the rationale behind creating the exhibition; its impact on the organization (including the board, if applicable), visitors, and/or community; and how it—and any challenges, risks, or rewards—might serve as a road map for others. Proposals might focus on an entire process or on a specific, innovative aspect, such as a new approach to community involvement, audience engagement, design, label writing—or something else.

The exhibitions/installations analyzed can be of any size, and take place in any of a variety of spaces: museums of all disciplines, historical sites, galleries, institutions that collect and display living collections, outdoor public spaces, virtual spaces, or other environments. Proposals might come from designers, architects, developers, interpretive planners, curators, writers, educators, collection managers, marketing staff, or others who create and contribute to exhibitions.

Proposals must:
1. Tell how the proposed article would relate to the issue’s theme;
indicate the approaches, strategies, or knowledge that readers will take away from the article;
2. Convey how the article would raise questions or illuminate larger issues that are widely applicable (especially if the proposal focuses on a single project or institution); and
3. Take into account that articles will be expected to provide critical, candid discussions about issues and challenges; if citing a project’s success, they will be expected to provide some level of evaluation in support of the claim.

Deadlines and information
Proposals of 250 words maximum are due January 4, 2017. Along with the proposal (which should include the title for the proposed article), briefly describe your background and your qualifications for writing the article. Our editorial advisory board will vet proposals, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance. If your proposal is accepted, articles (2,000 words maximum with four to five high-resolution images, captions, and credits) will be due March 30, 2017.

Please send all proposals (as Word documents only) via email to:
Ellen Snyder-Grenier (esnydergrenier@yahoo.com), Editor, Exhibition. Submissions from colleagues and students around the world are welcomed and encouraged.

 

View the online archive of the journal.

Subscribe to the Journal on the website of the American Alliance of Museums.

 

DATELINE: May 1, 2016

Call for Papers for Spring 2017 Issue of Exhibition (formerly Exhibitionist)

NOTE: This Call for Papers is now closed. Please come back in November for the next call for papers.

A journal of exhibition theory & practice for museum professionals, published by NAME, the National Association for Museum Exhibition.

"Designing Emotion"

Proposals due July 1, 2016

Research has shown that learning is both cognitive and emotional, and that what is emotionally experienced will create a more lasting impression. The spring 2017 issue of Exhibition tackles how we can design for emotion—with impact.

We invite proposals that show how exhibit design can be used to evoke a feeling, establish a mood, create connections, spark interest and revelation, inspire, persuade, or encourage (including but not limited to the use of graphics, media, color, technology, interpretive techniques, interactive elements, object-, text-, or sensory-based approaches, or design in general).

We also invite proposals that speak to the challenges, complexities, and responsibilities of designing for emotion. How can emotional engagement lead to learning? Learning of what sorts? Does emotion cloud our thinking or lead to new insights? What is the optimal amount of emotional arousal? Can too much emotional content run the risk of being manipulative?

The exhibitions/installations analyzed can be of any size, and take place in any of a variety of spaces: museums of all disciplines, historical sites, galleries, institutions that collect and display living collections, outdoor public spaces, or other environments. Proposals might come from designers, developers, interpretive planners, curators, architects, educators, collection managers, marketing staff, or others who create and contribute to exhibitions.

Proposals must:
Tell how the proposed article would relate to the issue’s theme;
Indicate the approaches, strategies, or knowledge that readers would take away from the article;
Convey how the article would raise questions or illuminate larger issues that are widely applicable (especially if the proposal focuses on a single project or institution).

Deadlines and information

Proposals are due July 1, 2016.

250 words maximum.

Along with the proposal, briefly describe your background and your qualifications for writing the article. Our editorial advisory board will vet proposals, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance. If your proposal is accepted, articles (2,000 words maximum with four to five high-resolution images, captions, and credits) will be due September 18, 2016.

Please note: accepted articles will be expected to provide critical, candid discussions about issues and challenges; if citing a project’s success, they will be expected to provide some level of evaluation in support.

 

Please send all proposals (as Word documents only) via email to:

Ellen Snyder-Grenier (esnydergrenier@yahoo.com), Editor, Exhibition. Submissions from colleagues and students around the world are welcomed and encouraged.

 

View the online archive of the journal.

Subscribe to the Journal.

 

 

Our Journal Gets a New Name and a New Look

DATELINE: April 18, 2016

Exhibition Spring 2016

Our journal gets a new name and a new look for the Spring 2016 issue.


Since 1990, NAME's journal, Exhibitionist, has served the exhibits community as a news outlet and a forum for the free and open discussion of exhibits, from nuts and bolts to business to the philosophical — reflexive, inclusive, and essential.

We are proud to announce a new name for NAME's publication, taking effect with the Spring 2016 issue:

Lady's and gentleman, meet the journal, Exhibition.

With the name change, we are excited to present a top-to-bottom redesign, by Charita Patamikakorn of koolgirlposse. It looks outstanding. Also, for the first time, the great stories and essays of the journal are accompanied by color.

The Spring 2016 issue of Exhibition is themed "The Power of Words: Written, Spoken, and Designed," and it will be arriving in mailboxes soon.

If you haven't, you should: Subscribe to Exhibition.

 

Call for Papers: Fall 2016 Exhibition Journal

DATELINE: November 10, 2015

Download this document

Coloring Outside the Lines: Exhibitions That Cross Boundaries

NOTE: The fall 2016 call for papers is now closed.
Please be sure to look back in May 2016 for the spring 2017 call for papers.

The Fall 2016 issue of Exhibition invites proposals about hybrids, crossovers, and combinations: exhibitions that—by mixing things up—push  boundaries, convey content in novel ways, provide unique visitor experiences, provoke new ways of looking, and lead us in new directions (and/or to new audiences).

Topics might include (but are not limited to) interdisciplinary exhibitions (for example, combining art, science, natural history, history, etc. in inventive ways); exhibitions that incorporate performance in a unique fashion; or spaces that walk a narrow line between program and exhibition (such as, for example, maker spaces).

The exhibitions (or installations) analyzed can be of any size, and take place in any of a variety of spaces: museums of all disciplines, historical sites, galleries, institutions that collect and display living collections, outdoor public spaces, or other environments. Proposals should indicate what approaches, strategies, or knowledge readers will take away from the article. In addition, if a proposal focuses on a single project or institution, it should raise questions or throw light on larger issues that are widely applicable.

Proposals might come from designers, developers, interpretive planners, curators, architects, educators, collection managers, or others who create and contribute to exhibitions. Submissions from colleagues and students around the world are welcomed and encouraged.

Deadlines and Information

Proposals due January 4, 2016, 250 words maximum. Briefly describe 1) your proposed article; how it relates to the issue’s theme; and what approaches, strategies, or knowledge readers will take away from it and 2) your background and your qualifications for writing the article. Proposals will be vetted by our editorial advisory board, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance.

Once accepted, completed articles—with four to five high-resolution images, captions, and credits—will be due March 30, 2016 (2,000 words maximum). Your article will be returned to you with comments and edits by the Exhibition editorial advisors and editor. Final articles will be due in early July 2016.

Please send all submissions (as Word documents) via email to:

Ellen Snyder-Grenier (esnydergrenier@yahoo.com), Editor, Exhibition.

View back issues of Exhibition / Exhibitionist.

Subscribe to Exhibition.

 

Excellence in Exhibition Label Writing Competition

DATELINE: October 8, 2015

Submit to the Competition:
aam-us.org/about-us/grants-awards-and-competitions/excellence-in-label-writing

The annual Excellence in Exhibition Label Writing Competition is sponsored by the American Alliance of Museum’s Curators Committee (CurCom) in cooperation with EdCom and NAME and in partnership with the Museology Graduate Program at the University of Washington, Seattle.


By highlighting the remarkable work of label writers and editors, the competition seeks to champion high quality label writing and inspire museum professionals to produce their very best work. Each year, selected exhibition labels are featured at the Marketplace of Ideas during the AAM annual meeting and in the competition’s online archive. The goal is to serve as a resource for museum professionals striving to write excellent label copy.


Each year, jurors representing CurCom, EdCom, NAME as well as previous honorees volunteer their time and expertise to review and select the winning entries. In 2015, the competition received over 70 submissions totaling over 180 labels. Of those, jurors identified just 13 labels to recognize. The skill and commitment of the jurors are the keys to making the release of the competition's winners an exciting event each year. Previous years' winning entries are accessible online through the competition’s archive. This archive offers museum professionals an opportunity to seek inspiration in a varied collection of excellent label writing techniques and styles and is one of the competition’s greatest assets.


2016 marks the fourth year of the collaboration between CurCom and the University of Washington. This unique partnership provides emerging museum professionals the opportunity to apply skills and theory presented in the classroom to a professional environment. As the competition project manager, graduate students at the University gain leadership, communication and management skills while engaging with label writers and other museum professionals.


John Russick, Vice President for Interpretation and Education at the Chicago History Museum has organized the competition since 2008. Each year a graduate student from the Museology Program serves as project manager. This year, Peter Kleinpass will manage the competition.


Our panel for the 2016 competition includes Joy Bivins (CurCom), Adam Tessier (NAME), Eileen Campbell (EdCom) and Kat Talley-Jones, whose label for Death Trap for Killers was honored in the 2015 competition.

Questions can be emailed to: Labelcmp@uw.edu

 

Call for Papers: Spring 2016 Exhibitionist

DATELINE: May 12, 2015

Download this document

The Power of Words: Written, spoken, and designed

Proposals due July 13, 2015

Words matter. In exhibitions, they can be effective communicators. When well written and well designed, they can affect visitors’ experiences in positive and powerful ways, enhancing understanding, meaning making, and reflection. Moreover, choosing the right words is important. As the International Network of Museums for Peace writes, “When we choose our words, we must be aware of how they affect attitudes, values ​​and actions.”

For this issue of Exhibitionist, we seek proposals that focus broadly on the use of words in exhibitions (or in elements within exhibitions). Proposals might address such questions as:

 

  • What are best practices for creating engaging text? How can we be better writers?
  • How does/can design best communicate words’ meaning(s)? What are best practices in creating a potent, effective visual language?
  • What are innovative ways  (analog or digital) to deal with the conundrum of how to treat—and where to put—labels? And how to make them accessible to all?
  • What are innovative alternatives to expressing or representing words and information (such as data visualization, generative design, or sound)?
  • In today’s world, what critical understandings must we have about commonly used words that are used to label or identify people, places, or events?

 

The exhibitions (or installations) analyzed can be of any size, and take place in any of a variety of spaces: museums of all disciplines, historical sites, galleries, institutions that collect and display living collections, or other environments. Proposals might come from writers, designers, curators, developers, architects, educators, collection managers, or others who create and contribute to exhibitions.

As much as possible, the article should not focus on a single project or institution without raising questions or throwing light on larger issues that are widely applicable. Submissions from colleagues and students around the world are welcomed and encouraged.

Deadlines

Proposal due July 13, 2015; 250 words maximum. Briefly describe 1) your article and how it relates to the issue theme and 2) your background and your qualifications for writing the article. Proposals will be vetted by our editorial advisory board, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance.

First draft due October 2, 2015; 2,000 words maximum (approximately four single-spaced pages) with four to five high-resolution images, captions, and credits. Your article will be returned to you for revision with comments and edits by the Exhibitionist editorial advisors and editor.

Final article due January 4, 2016.

Please send all submissions (as Word documents) via email to:

Ellen Snyder-Grenier (esnydergrenier@yahoo.com), Editor, Exhibitionist.

 

View back issues of Exhibitionist.

Subscribe to the journal.

 

Call for Papers Fall 2015 Exhibitionist

DATELINE: February 20, 2015

Download this document

Creating an Inclusive Experience: Exhibitions and Universal Design

Proposals due April 13, 2015

In 2015, we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the American With Disabilities Act (ADA). To mark this milestone,Exhibitionist takes on the topic of “Universal Design.” While Universal Design evolved from Accessible Design—and uses accessibility as a starting point—it goes further. It recognizes that human abilities are wide-ranging, and that all of us, if we live out a typical lifespan, will experience some sort of functional limitation. For those involved with exhibitions, this means creating environments that are usable by everyone with the least amount of adaptation. It calls for creative and imaginative ways to engage the widest possible group of users.

For this issue, we seek proposals that focus on exhibitions as a whole—or on elements within an exhibition (such as media, technology, multisensory elements, label-writing, etc.)—that incorporate the principles of Universal Design.* The exhibitions (or installations) can be of any size, and take place in any of a variety of spaces: museums of all disciplines, historical sites, institutions that collect and display living collections, or other environments.

Proposals can also focus on broader institutional strategies for including Universal Design in exhibition making, or on teaching Universal Design to those who create exhibitions. Proposals might come from designers, curators, developers, writers, architects, educators, collection managers, or others who create and contribute to exhibitions. As much as possible, if a case study, research project, or student experience is submitted, the article should not focus on a single project or institution without raising questions or throwing light on larger issues that are widely applicable.

Submissions from colleagues and students around the world are welcome and encouraged.

Deadlines

Proposal due: April 13, 2015. 250 words maximum. Briefly describe your article; how it relates to the issue theme; and your background/qualifications for writing the article. Proposals will be vetted by our editorial advisory board, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance.

First draft due: June 12, 2015. 2,000 words maximum (approximately four single-spaced pages) with four to five high-resolution images, captions, and credits. Your article will be returned to you with comments and edits by theExhibitionist editorial advisors and editor.

Final article due: August 11, 2015


Please send all submissions via email to:
Ellen Snyder-Grenier (esnydergrenier at yahoo.com)
Editor, Exhibitionist, the journal of the National Association for Museum Exhibition (NAME)

 

View back issues of Exhibitionist.

Subscribe to the journal.


*For information on the principles of Universal Design, please see:

www.ncsu.edu/ncsu/design/cud/about_ud/udprinciples.htm

www.humancentereddesign.org/universal-design

www.CAST.org

 

Twenty-Seventh Annual Excellence in Exhibition Competition

DATELINE: November 11, 2014

The American Alliance of Museums is now taking entries for the 27th Annual Excellence in Exhibition Competition.

The 27th Annual Excellence in Exhibition Competition recognizes outstanding achievement in the exhibition format from all types of museums, zoos, aquariums, botanical gardens, and any other types of non-commercial institutions offering exhibitions to the public.

The competition is the joint project of the following American Alliance of Museums Professional Networks (PNs): Curators Committee (CURCOM), the National Association for Museum Exhibition (NAME), the Committee on Audience Research and Evaluation (CARE), and the Education Committee (EdCom). Each PN is represented by one competition judge who evaluates the submitted application materials against the Alliance’s Standards for Museum Exhibitions.

Any non-commercial institution offering exhibitions to the public may participate. Exhibitions may have been designed by a commercial firm for a non-commercial institution. Each institution that enters must have a team member that is a member of the Alliance. The exhibition must have opened to the public between November 30, 2012 and November 30, 2014.

Entries must be received by Friday, January 16, 2015.

Download more information and the entry form.

 

2015 AAM Annual Meeting Session Proposals

DATELINE: August 7, 2014

The 2015 AAM Annual Meeting session proposal site is now open. Members of the National Program Committee are beginning to help colleagues with their proposals, generating ideas for sessions and encouraging people to submit sessions.

It's up to NAME members and others in the exhibition community to ensure that there are fabulous and pertinent sessions at the Annual meeting in Atlanta. Submit a proposal, share feedback on existing proposals, and work with your colleagues to share expertise, innovation, and best practices!

Contact Becky Menlove or Jenny-Sayre Ramberg for support. For technical questions regarding the submission process go to helpdesk@aam-us.org.

Here are the dates to keep in mind--there's just one month to get those submissions in!

KEY DATES
Session Proposal Submission Site Opens: July 14
Session Proposals Submitted/Site Closes: August 25
National Program Committee Reviewer Period: September 2- 22
National Program Committee In-Person Session Review: October 1-2
Session Acceptance/Non-Acceptance Sent: Mid-November

 

Call for Papers: Exhibitionist Journal, Spring 2015 Edition

DATELINE: July 14, 2014


Issue Theme: The nimble and responsive exhibition

As John Falk and Beverly Sheppard write in Thriving in the Knowledge Age: New Business Models for Museums and Other Cultural Institutions, “Words like innovative, community-relevance, responsive, and flexible are increasingly being used as criteria of museum excellence and as the basis for support.”

What does this mean for best practices in creating exhibitions? What are the challenges, risks, and rewards of moving quickly or experimentally, or for being impromptu? How can we be responsive to the world outside? How might such exhibitions involve community in innovative and inclusive ways? What does the process for a “nimble” exhibition look like, and how can we create systems that prepare us to be nimble when we need to be?

The Spring 2015 Exhibitionist will focus on exhibitions that are nimble and responsive, created in response to current events, community needs and interest, or as part of a museum’s own practice and strategy. We will be considering exhibitions and installations of any size that take place in a variety of spaces—museums of all disciplines, historical sites, institutions that collect and display living collections—and may include pop-up exhibitions and mobile formats (such as trucks or trains).

Proposals might come from curators, developers, designers, educators, collection managers, or others who create and contribute to museum exhibitions. They can include research, essays, and case studies that innovatively analyze, comment on, or describe individual projects or broad themes, ideas, and trends.

As much as possible, if a case study, research project, or student experience is submitted, the article should not focus on a single project or institution without raising questions or throwing light on larger issues that are widely applicable. 

Submissions from colleagues and students around the world are welcome and encouraged.

Deadlines:
Proposal deadline: September 3, 2014. 250 words maximum. Briefly describe your article; how it relates to the issue theme; and your background/qualifications for writing the article. Proposals will be vetted by our editorial advisory board, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance within several weeks. A style sheet will be sent to you if your proposal is accepted.

First draft deadline:  November 10, 2014. 2,000 words maximum (approximately eight double-spaced pages, including references). Your article will be returned by December 12, 2014 with comments and edits by Exhibitionist editorial advisors and editor.

Final article deadline: January 12, 2015. Final article due with four or five images, captions, and credits.

Please send all submissions via email to:
Ellen Snyder-Grenier (esnydergrenier at yahoo.com)
Incoming Editor, Exhibitionist, the journal of the National Association for Museum Exhibition (NAME)

 

NAME at the AAM Annual Meeting in Seattle

DATELINE: May 13, 2014

The American Alliance of Museums, NAME's mother organization, holds its Annual Meeting in Seattle May 18th through the 21st.

We hope to see you there. Check out the AAM Sessions of Interest to NAME Members to help you plan your conference schedule and not miss an important session!

 

Join us for an upcoming #ExhibitChat!

DATELINE: May 3, 2014

 

Hosted by the National Association for Museum Exhibition @nameexhibitions

What's happening with exhibitions and technology? Join us for two Twitter chats this May with the authors of two articles from the fall issue of Exhibitionist Journal on “New Media: Transforming Museums, Exhibitions, and Visitors.”

Chat #1: Meaningful engagement using technology

Tuesday, May 13, 3-4pm ET

Museums can be shelters in the storms of change where visitors can connect to the real, physical world even while taking advantage of the latest advances in virtual experiences. How can we leverage mobile and other technologies strategically to support meaningful interactions in museum spaces?

Chat with:

@nightkitchen - Stacey Mann, Director of Learning Strategies, Night Kitchen Interactive
@mefisher - Matthew Fisher, President, Night Kitchen Interactive

Read the article: “Catching Our Breath: Assessing Digital Technologies for Meaningful Engagement”

Chat #2: Using free and low-cost apps to engage visitors

Thursday, May 29, 1-2pm ET

Many museums do not offer mobile experiences due to lack of financial and staff resources. Find out how four museums/science centers in the IMLS-funded 21-Tech project are using readily available low-cost apps as tools for floor staff to deepen visitors’ experiences with science content.

Chat with:
@garibaygroup - Cecilia Garibay, Principal, Garibay Group
@ndamani1 - Neelam Damani, 21-Tech Project Manager, Children’s Museum of Houston

Read the article: “21-Tech: Engaging Visitors Using Open Source Apps”

 

NAME Events Winter 2014

DATELINE: February 13, 2014

Two big NAME events on their way this Winter: a networking and exhibition critique session at the New York Hall of Science, and a behind-the-scenes workshop in Gallery One at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Human+ Networking and Exhibit Critique Session
Join museum friends for networking & light refreshments at the New York Hall of Science, February 28th from 6:30 - 8:30 pm. You’ll also have an opportunity to view and give feedback on the new exhibition, Human+.
For complete details, see the official announcement for the Human+ Networking Event.

Behind the Scenes: Gallery One
A Design and Interpretation Pop-up Workshop at the Cleveland Museum of Art, Saturday March 15th, 1 - 3:30 pm. In early 2013, the Cleveland Museum of Art launched Gallery One, an interactive space, and ArtLens, an iPad app. In this workshop, get behind-the-scenes with key staff involved in the development of one the museum’s most ambitious interpretive projects to date.
For complete details, see the official announcement for Behind the Scenes: Gallery One.

 

Call for papers for Fall 2014 Exhibitionist

DATELINE: January 20, 2014

Issue Theme: Teaching and Learning About Exhibition Design and Development

In this issue we will focus on how the art and discipline of exhibition development and design are taught and learned. We will be considering these practices in museums of all disciplines as well as institutions that collect and display living collections.

What are current best practices and challenges in this aspect of museum work? What impact has the digital revolution had on how we teach and learn about exhibitions? What skills and disciplines are involved, and has this changed over the years? How can we most effectively teach these skills, in a classroom setting, through apprenticeships, or some combination? Proposals might come from museum studies programs – either from teachers or students. Or they might come from museum staff or consultants who teach exhibition design and development, either in formal programs or through internships or apprenticeships.

Proposals can include research, essays, and case studies about teaching and/or learning about exhibition design and development. Submissions from colleagues and students around the world are welcome.

As much as possible, if a case study, research project, or student experience is submitted, the article should not focus on a single project, museum, or program without raising questions or throwing light on larger issues that are widely applicable.

To view back issues of Exhibitionist go to the NAME website: http://name-aam.org/resources/exhibitionist/back-issues-and-online-archive

Deadlines
Proposal deadline: April 11, 2014. 250 word maximum.  Briefly describe your article; how it relates to the issue theme; your background/qualifications for writing the article.  Proposals will be vetted by our editorial advisory board, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance within several weeks. A style sheet will be sent to you when your proposal is accepted.

First draft deadline:  June 20, 2014.   2000 word maximum.  Your article will be returned by early-mid July with comments and edits by editorial advisors and editor.

Final article deadline: August 8, 2014.  Final article due with four or five images, credits, and captions.

Please send all submissions to Gretchen Jennings, Editor of Exhibitionist, the journal of the National Association for Museum Exhibition (NAME): gretchenjennings@rcn.com

 

Twenty-Sixth Annual Excellence in Exhibition Competition

DATELINE: December 9, 2013

The Twenty-Sixth Annual Excellence in Exhibition Competition recognizes outstanding achievement in the exhibition format from all types of museums, zoos, aquariums, botanical gardens, and any other types of non-commercial institutions offering exhibitions to the public. The competition is the joint project of the following American Alliance of Museums Professional Networks (PNs): Curators Committee (CURCOM), the National Association for Museum Exhibition (NAME), the Committee on Audience Research and Evaluation (CARE), and the Education Committee (EdCom). Each PN is represented by one competition judge who evaluates the submitted application materials against the Alliance’s Standards for Museum Exhibitions.
Eligibility
Any non-commercial institution offering exhibitions to the public may participate. Exhibitions may have been designed by a commercial firm for a non-commercial institution. Each institution that enters must have a team member that is a member of the Alliance. The exhibition must have opened to the public between November 30, 2011 and November 30, 2013. To be eligible, exhibitions may not have previously won this competition. Exhibitions may be submitted only once to the competition.

For complete information, visit the Competition Entry Form.

 

2013 Excellence in Exhibitions Competition

DATELINE: October 11, 2013

The Excellence in Exhibition Competition, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, recognizes exhibitions for overall excellence or for stretching the limits of exhibition content and design through innovation. This year’s entries were peer reviewed based on the newly updated AAM Standards for Museums Exhibitions and Indicators of Excellence which include criteria in seven major categories: audience awareness; evaluation; content; collections; interpretation and communication; design and production; and human comfort, safety, and accessibility. Awards are sponsored by four of AAM's Professional Networks including the Committee on Audience Research and Evaluation (CARE), Curators Committee (CurCom), Education Committee (EdCom) and National Association of Museum Exhibition (NAME).

Elizabeth Kunz Kollmann, the 2013 Excellence in Exhibition Competition coordinator, said, “This year we received an impressive 28 exhibition entries from around the world representing content topics as diverse as LGBT issues to mammoths to World’s Fair art. The exhibition entries showed the commitment of the museum field to continually push the boundaries of what exhibitions can and should be. In particular, I am impressed with how this year’s winners seamlessly combined sometimes controversial and often personally relevant content with designs that were beautiful and effective.”

2013 Awards

Special Distinction – Aesthetics and Materials: Longwood Gardens, “Light: Installations by Bruce Munro”
This temporary exhibition displayed eight light installations by UK artist, Bruce Munro. Artworks were strategically placed throughout Longwood Gardens to highlight a range of areas within the gardens transforming lakes, meadows, forests, and fields in ways that demonstrated the links between nature and culture. The Excellence in Exhibition Competition chose this exhibition for an award of special distinction because of its innovative use of everyday materials to create an aesthetically beautiful exhibition experience that expanded the role of public gardens as a place to not only view nature but also appreciate art.

Special Distinction – Messaging and Engagement: The California Museum, “Health Happens Here”
This permanent exhibition was developed for California elementary students and policy makers to change attitudes and assumptions about health. Instead of a focus on individual behavior, this exhibition takes a community‐based perspective by showing that health happens in neighborhoods, in schools, and with prevention through components that promote interactivity, personal connections, and empowerment. The Excellence in Exhibition Competition chose this exhibition for an award of special distinction because it tackled an old topic (health) in a new way that sought not just to teach but also to empower visitors.

Special Distinction – Community Engagement: Chicago History Museum, “Out in Chicago”
This temporary exhibition explored the vibrant lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) history of Chicago from the 1850s through today. It detailed the emergence of diverse LGBT communities, emphasizing the everyday lives of these Chicagoans as well as their activist struggles for equality and against homophobia and the fear of gender difference. The Excellence in Exhibition Competition chose this exhibition for an award of special distinction because of its continued commitment to engaging the community in telling the story of a group who has not been heard from so contextually and completely before.

Special Distinction – Alignment of Site and Mission: Natural History Museum of Utah, Suite of Exhibitions: “Sky,” “Life,” “Land,” “First Peoples,” “Great Salt Lake,” and “Past Worlds”
These six permanent exhibitions provide a place‐based visitor experience rooted in the natural
phenomena that Utah’s unique landscapes and ecosystems reveal and the science they inspire. Though the content of the exhibitions are different, they are connected spatially as well as thematically through common topics about energy flow, evolution, ecology, and biodiversity. The Excellence in Exhibition Competition chose these exhibitions for an award of special distinction because they were especially effective in how they use their exterior and interior space to achieve their mission.

 

Collaborative Approaches, Meaningful Experiences Symposium

DATELINE: August 20, 2013

Symposium at The University of the Arts, Philadelphia, October 11-October 12

The UArts' Museum Studies Department presents this Dynamic Symposium that will engage attendees with presentations, conversations and workshops focusing on collaborative approaches to integrative design thinking in the creation of meaningful social experiences and interactions within exhibitions. These provocateurs have utilized museums as public venues to facilitate local and global change.

Discussions and installations led by: Mark O'Neill, Elaine Heumann Gurian, Paul Martin, FLUX Foundation, Leslie Bedford, and Jeremy Beaudry.

More information and registration at: cs.uarts.edu/creatingexhibitions

 

Call for Papers for Spring 2014 issue of Exhibitionist

DATELINE: July 22, 2013

Intentionally Designed Settings: How Does Design Affect Visitor Engagement, Understanding,  and Meaning-Making?

Museums, science centers, aquariums, and zoos, along with their exhibitions and programs, have been described as "intentionally designed spaces" for learning.  "Like everyday learning, learning in designed settings is highly participant structured, but also reflects the intended communicative and pedagogical goals of designers and educators."(Bell et al. 2009. National Academy of Sciences)

Although this description was written specifically about science learning, it can be applied much more broadly to include museums of all disciplines.

This issue of Exhibitionist will look at the impact of design – both 3D and graphic, whether in-house or outsourced--on visitor meaning-making, understanding, and engagement with exhibitions.  As much as possible, some assessment of the impact should be part of the article.

Proposals can include research, essays, and case studies that illustrate and analyze the impact of design on the visitor experience. Articles might include how a design process itself, such as "agile design" or "design thinking," shapes and influences project outcomes.  As much as possible, if a case study or research project is submitted, the article should not focus on a single project or museum without raising questions or throwing light on larger issues that are widely applicable. Proposals from colleagues around the world are welcome.

Deadlines:
Proposal deadline: August 23, 2013. 250 word maximum.  Briefly describe your article; how it relates to issue theme; your background/qualifications for writing the article.  Proposals will be vetted by our editorial advisory board, and you will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance by mid-October. A style sheet will be sent to you when your proposal is accepted.
First draft deadline:  December 16, 2013. 2000 word maximum.  Your article will be returned by mid-February, 2014 with comments and edits by editorial advisors and editor.
Final article deadline: March 7, 2014. Final article due with four or five images, credits, and captions.

Send questions and proposals to Gretchen Jennings, Editor, Exhibitionist, the journal of the National Association for Museum Exhibition (NAME): gretchenjennings@rcn.com

You can take a look at back issues of Exhibitionist on our Exhibitionist pages.

 

Public Lecture Fund Established in Honor of Janet A. Kamien

DATELINE: March 27, 2013

The Janet A. Kamien Fund has been established at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.  We invite you to contribute to the fund in her honor, to continue one of the practices that she loved: encouraging aspiring student and professional exhibition creators.  The fund is co-sponsored by NAME (the National Association for Museum Exhibition) and will go toward a public lecture series and dialogues in association with the University’s annual exhibition charette.  Funds will be earmarked for travel and accommodations to bring thought leaders from across the country for as many years as the Fund exists.

Janet Kamien, 1949-2013, was an internationally recognized exhibition developer, consultant and teacher for exhibition development and learning.  Her impressive life was also framed by her epic personality which invited everyone to revel in her broad range of interests, including reading, gardening, crossword puzzles, cooking from around the world, and mostly asking “How are you? What are you doing?”

Always committed to improving horizons, Janet encouraged people to bring their own experience to bear in creating the best possible opportunity for others to become lifelong learners and to appreciate personal and global aspects of life on earth.

Please consider a contribution:
The Janet A. Kamien Fund
University of the Arts, Museum Studies Department
c/o Polly McKenna-Cress
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19123